a Rabbi Tuvia Bolton Story | Torah

Rabbi Tuvia Bolton Parsha Story for Parshat Terumah (AKA: T’rumah / T’ruma) 5769

Posted on February 27, 2009. Filed under: A Parsha Story, a Rabbi Bolton Story, a Rabbi Tuvia Bolton Story, a Rabbi Tuvia Bolton Story | Torah, Jewish Customs, Jewish traditions, Parshas T’ruma, Parshas T’rumah, Parshas Terumah, Parshat Hashavua, Parshat Hashavuah, Parshat T’ruma, Parshat T’rumah, Parshat Terumah, Rabbi Bolton Stories, Rabbi Bolton Story, Rabbi Tuvia Bolton Story, Story by Rabbi Bolton, T’ruma, T’rumah, Terumah, The Parshah Story, The Truth, Torah, Torah is THE Truth, True, Truth, Weekly Parsha, Weekly Parshah, Weekly sedra, Weekly Sedrah | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

BS”D

A Parsha Story by:

Rabbi Tuvia Bolton of OhrTmimim.Org/torah

On this week’s Parsha:

Parshat Terumah (AKA: T’rumah / T’ruma) 5769

This week we begin the month of Adar; the “Month that transforms sadness to joy, mourning to festivity” (Esther 9:22). We also read this Shabbat the Torah portion “T’ruma” which explains the building of the Holy Temple.

The reason that Adar is called the ‘month’ that changes sadness to joy is because it contains the holiday of Purim; the happiest holiday in Judaism. But, seemingly this is no reason to call it the happiest MONTH.

Also the idea of a Holy Temple doesn’t seem to fit the message of Judaism that G-d is omnipresent and infinite?

G-d is everywhere! Why do we need a holy Temple?

To understand this… here is a story. (HaGeula weekly page #445)

Mrs. Nechama Dina Bernstein took her pupils for an outing.  Why not? It was one of the eight days of Chanukah when Jewish schools of all sorts take vacations and make special programs. But this outing was special. She took the girls to a local shopping center in New Jersey to light, not Chanukah candles but Jews.

It was an invention of the Lubavitcher Rebbe; to go into public places, search for uneducated/ uninspired/ unattached Jews and give them a taste of Judaism.  In this case it meant telling them about the holiday of Chanukah and its laws, customs and deeper meanings.

Mrs. Bernstein was a very responsible, precise teacher and she demanded the same from her pupils; tardiness or disorder of any sort was out of the question.

So when they agreed that the girls would split up into groups of three to cover as much area as possible and would meet back at the bus in an hour and a half it meant no later than an hour and a half!

The girls took pamphlets and Chanukah candles and set off in different direction while she took what remained and went alone to search for Jews in a different direction.

After almost an hour of successful wandering about and talking to women about the holiday she looked at her watch to see that forty minutes remained, enough for two or perhaps three more discussions.  She noticed several women and a young man sitting around the table of an outdoor restaurant and approached.

“Anyone here Jewish?” She asked the women with a smile. Two women raised their hand in good spirits and a lively conversation ensued.  She told them about the holiday, they asked questions, she answered, they replied and the conversation continued for several minutes. Meanwhile the other women, who were just saying goodbye when Mrs. Bernstein appeared, left while the young man, who obviously was not Jewish, sat and listened to the discussion.

Suddenly Mrs. Bernstein looked at her watch and exclaimed. “Oh, my goodness! We’ve been talking for forty five minutes! I must go!!! I’m already late!”

She shook hands with the women, they exchanged telephone numbers, left some of the pamphlets and candles with them and ran off to her pupils and the bus.

But she stopped. A voice inside of her was saying she shouldn’t have completely ignored the young man, ‘You should have at least asked him if he was Jewish’. But then she thought again. ‘Why, that’s foolish! I’m late! And he didn’t look at all Jewish! I’m not going back!”

But the first voice won.

She turned around, walked briskly back to the table, approached the young man who was now sitting alone and said “Excuse me but, by the way, are you Jewish?”

She never would have expected his reaction. His eyes filled with tears, he began trembling so severely that the food fell from his fork on his shirt leaving a large stain and he began to cry.

Mrs. Bernstein was confused, she apologized handed him a few napkins and apologized again.

“Why did you ask me that?!” the young man said between sniffles. “Why did you come back and ask me that!?” He said again drying his eyes and blowing his nose a few times.

“I don’t really know.” She replied. “I can’t really explain it. I just did. But why are you crying? What happened? I’m sorry. But please tell me, are you Jewish?”

“I’ll tell you.” He replied. “I don’t think you understand what a miracle just happened now.” He invited her to sit down and began to talk.

“First of all my name is Fred (pseudonym) I was born to a Jewish mother, so that makes me Jewish, right? But my father is not Jewish. To you that probably isn’t important because I’m still a Jew but to me it meant confusion.

“My mother wasn’t at all observant, I mean she did marry a gentile, but for some reason she insisted that if they had children they would be given an orthodox Jewish education. Doesn’t make sense but my father agreed and when I was born… I became that child.

“When I was three they enrolled me in a real Jewish school and by the age of five I not only could read the Torah, I looked and acted like a religious Jew with a yarmulke, locks of hair at the sides of my head, Tzitzis, on the four corners of my garments; the whole business!

“But you can imagine what a feeling I had everyday when I went back to my totally non-religious home. And although my parents didn’t bother me about my Jewish appearance the kids in school bothered me about my home. They were just little kids and, well you know how kids can be cruel sometimes. But they mostly made fun because of my appearance. I looked exactly like my father; blond hair, blue eyes, small bobbed nose in other words like a total gentile and every once in a while even the teachers made remarks.

“Anyway, it made me confused and miserable and when my parents saw how it was ruining me they talked it over and when I got to the fifth grade they decided to move me to a normal public school.

“After the move it only took a few days till I removed all the signs of Judaism, made new friends and almost forgot the whole episode but deep in my heart I knew I was different.  What I had learned in the Jewish school stuck with me, but so did the negative experiences.

“Sometimes I even would talk to G-d and ask Him why He put me in this confusion but I didn’t get any answers; only more confusion.  So I tried to take my mind off it and just live life like everyone else.

“But once in a while I had attacks of identity and one of them was just now. When you came and asked everyone except me if they were Jewish my heart broke; all the frustration, anger and sadness came back to me.  Then, when you walked away I decided to have my final talk with G-d.  I said ‘G-d, if that lady comes back here and asks me if I’m Jewish then….. I’m Jewish. But if not….. I’m never going to think about it or talk to you about it again!’

“So if you are wondering why you came back… now you know; it was G-d answering my prayers!”

This answers our questions.

When someone decides to make a real change in life it doesn’t just mean just changing appearance, attitude or personality. These are only from the soul outward.

True change means changing oneself to reveal one’s soul and live according to the truth; according to the will of the Creator.

Like Fred when he prayed and risked being different and Mrs. Bernstein when she returned to the table and risked missing her bus. Both were interested only in one thing; what does G-d want from them. And when they made the decision it changed their lives and certainly the lives of those around them.

That is why the miracle of Purim, when the Jews refused to deny their Judaism and escape Haman’s decree of ‘Destroy all the Jews’, effected the entire month and the Holy Temple, where Jews devoted themselves totally to the Creator, effected the entire world.

Because when one makes that decision to live only according to the will of the Creator it can connects the infinite to the finite; all time and space.

This is why one of the main accomplishments of Moshiach will be to change the priorities of all the Jewish people (like it was in Purim) and build a Third Temple (like in our weekly Torah portion).

Because through these changes the entire creation; all time, space and consciousness, will be PERMANENTLY purified to reveal the TRUE oneness of G-d.

It’s all up to us, to change ourselves and do all we can to bring….

Moshiach NOW!!



Copyright © 1999-2008 Rabbi Tuvia Bolton of Yeshiva Ohr T’mimim (OhrTmimim.Org/torah) in K’far Chabad, Israe-l

All rights reserved. No unauthorized reproduction or copying of this material shall occur without prior permission.



We recommend that you visit them for more info…

*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***

*** We WANT Moshiach, Now!!! ***

By the way, You, too, can help hasten the coming of Moshiach, by doing ONE more Mitzvah. ***

*** We WANT Moshiach, Now!!! ***

*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Rabbi Bolton’s Parsha Story: Parshas Vayechi 5769

Posted on January 9, 2009. Filed under: A Parsha Story, a Rabbi Bolton Story, a Rabbi Tuvia Bolton Story, a Rabbi Tuvia Bolton Story | Torah, Jewish Customs, Jewish traditions, Parshas Hashavua, Parshas Hashavuah, Parshas Vayechi, Parshat Hashavua, Parshat Hashavuah, Parshat Vayechi, Rabbi Bolton Stories, Rabbi Bolton Story, Rabbi Tuvia Bolton Story, Story by Rabbi Bolton, The Parshah Story, The Truth, Torah, Torah is THE Truth, True, Truth, Weekly Parsha, Weekly Parshah, Weekly sedra, Weekly Sedrah | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

BS”D

A Parsha Story by:

Rabbi Tuvia Bolton of OhrTmimim.Org/torah

On this week’s Parsha:

Vayechi 5769

This week’s Torah portion tells us of the blessings that Yaakov gave to his sons shortly before he passed away

At first glance this is not understood. What exactly are blessings aren’t they just good wishes? And what do we care about blessings given some 3,500 years ago? Even more, Yaakov’s sons eventually became the 12 tribes and today we don’t even know where they are or even if these still exist!

To understand this here is a story (The Storyteller Vol. 3 Pg 177)

The city of Nikolsberg, Moravia (now Czechoslovakia) was famous for its long chain of great Rabbis reaching back almost a thousand years. Among them were the famous Maharal of Prague and the Tosfos Yom Tov but perhaps the last in the line was the great Tzadik Rebbe Shmuel Shmelka; pupil of the Chassidic master the Maggid of Mazrich (successor of the Baal Shem Tov) some 250 years ago.

Rabbi Shmelka was truly fitting for the post; he was a great Talmudic and Legal genius, his advice was impeccable and his brotherly love was seemingly without limit. Many were the nights that his eyes saw no sleep because he was involved in the problems of others and he was very proficient in the mysteries of Kabbalah.

But despite his flawless character and selfless nature he was once the center of a controversy that only miracles were able to quell.

One of the richer Jews in Nikolsberg, who we will call Groisman, was sued by one of its poorer members. The details were not passed down so it’s not clear what the suit was about nor the amount involved but what we do know is that Rabbi Shmelka, after hearing all the arguments and seeing the evidence, decided in favor of the poor man.

Groisman was boiling mad; not only had been found guilty and lost money he had been humiliated publicly by a nobody! He declared war! After all, he told himself, he didn’t become the wealthiest man in town by surrendering!

He was clever about it. First he began quietly complaining and, because he was rich, people began to listen. At first it was only his family and friends but slowly the circle began to widen. Friends spoke to their friends and their friends to their friends until within a few months the town became a cauldron of discontent.

Gradually Groisman’s claims became clear; ‘The Rabbi, he whispered to a ready audience, is one of the Chassidim who consult the Kaballah and other mystical books for their decisions. Who knows when he would claim that some angel or spirit told him to change the Torah! Indeed, this is probably the reason he found me guilty. Maybe tomorrow he’ll make up a new religion!

The tone of things became increasingly sinister until one day placards appeared on the street announcing a meeting in the great Synagogue to discuss ‘pressing issues’.

That night some one thousand men were packed into the huge auditorium and the voices began to be angrier until they finally took a vote and decided to oust the Rabbi! Groisman had succeeded!

Suddenly the voice of the old Shamash (sextant) of the Synagogue rang out from somewhere. “Wait! WAIT!! I want to talk!”

Everyone looked up to see the old fellow standing at the podium in the middle of the Synagogue open hands raised for silence.

He must have been over eighty years old and his high pitched voice rang clearly over the crowd until everyone’s curiosity was aroused. “Wait!! I want to talk!” He kept repeating until there was silence.

As far as anyone remembered he had never raised his voice or spoken more than a few quiet sentences in all the years he had been in the Synagogue. What could he want now? He cleared his throat and spoke.

“I want to say something important.” He looked around to see that everyone was listening and continued. “Two things that I saw that I swore I would never tell but I think it’s important.”

The room was still.

“It was about ten years ago, just after we chose our Reb Shmelka. Well, I was making my rounds early in the morning before sunrise, ringing my bell and knocking on windows to wake everyone up for the Morning Prayer. When I got to the Rabbi’s house I saw the light was on in his window so I looked in. There he was sitting and learning Talmud with some wild-looking long-haired Jew with leather girdle around his waist.”

I figured it must be some traveler or something, really I thought it might be one of the ’36 hidden Holy Men (Tzaddikim) that I read about somewhere but I kept quiet.
“But when I saw him again there the next morning, standing before the Rabbi and listening to his learning I decided I’d ask. Later that day I caught the Rabbi alone in Synagogue after the prayers and asked him who the man was and the Rabbi was very surprised.

“‘What, you saw him?’ he asked a few times. Until he finally said, ‘Well if you saw him then I’ll tell you. That was Elijah the prophet (who lived some 2,700 years ago and appears regularly to the righteous) but best not to talk about it.’

The Shamash cleared his voice and continued. “Then a few days later I saw him again but this time it was really frightening.

“It was late at night and the Rabbi was standing at the door holding a candle holder with two very bright candles escorting some people from his house. When they got to the door I saw them. One was the same Elijah the Prophet but the other. Well I couldn’t believe my eyes but it was a real king with royal garments and a crown . and even carrying a royal scepter! I was petrified with fear and awe.

“The Rabbi escorted his guests out the door for a few more steps until they disappeared then he returned to his house to continue his Torah study.

“Well, I don’t know what made me do it but I waited a few minutes, said a prayer, approached the Rabbi’s door and knocked. He had been so friendly to me the time before I figured he would tell me who that king was.

“So I went in and told him that I just happened to be passing and saw what I saw and I asked my question.

“The Rabbi looked at me for a while, told me to sit down and explained.

“He said that a few weeks ago in a certain town in Poland a tragedy occurred. There, there lived a simple Jewish artisan who was obsessed with hatred for idols and idolatry. He made his living by making small dolls and toys and the third of the Ten Commandments “You shall not make for yourselves any carved idol or any image’ literally burned in his heart. In fact he spoke of it non-stop.

“One night he went crazy. He ran into town and began smashing every statue he saw including the ones in front of the Church until he was caught by a crowd and beaten and killed for his crime. It was with greatest difficulty that the Jewish community there was able to convince the gentiles that he acted alone but the whole thing was so traumatic on the elders of the community that they refused to provide for his widow from the widow’s fund.

“They argued that because the poor fellow knew very well that he would be killed for his actions he was responsible for throwing his life and his money away and she should be paid from the communal charity like all the other paupers, which meant a lot less money.

“Anyway she complained to the Rabbis of her town and when they couldn’t decide what to do, they brought the case to our Rabbi.

“That was yesterday in the day. Last night the Rabbi was sitting and pouring through books for a solution when the two visitors I mentioned visited him.

“And that king was none other than Menasha, the idolatrous son of King Hezkiahu (see Kings 2:21:19)!

“He said that since his death, over two thousand years ago, he had been reincarnated time and time again to atone for his blasphemous sins (among which was erecting an idol in the Holy Temple!) but his soul found no rest until it became incarnated in this Jewish artisan.

That explains his unexplainable hatred of idols; it was the result of Menasha’s tormented soul seeking repentance.

“And that’s why he came to Rav Shmelka; to explain to him that the artisan was neither crazy nor suicidal, rather he was sacrificing his life to destroy idolatry and sanctify G-d’s name; the only thing that would purify Menasha’s soul. Reb Shmelka didn’t tell me what he would decide but he did ask me to keep the matter quiet but I couldn’t.

Now, my friends and brothers.” The Shamash concluded. “I felt I had to tell you this so you should know what a holy Rabbi we have. I beg you not to be angry with him and I hope he won’t be angry with me for telling.” Then turning to Mr. Groisman he said, “Surely if he decided against you it was for the benefit of everyone involved including youor at least your soul.”

The group dispersed and the impeachment was canceled.

This explains our questions.

Just as the sins of King Menasha had a spiritual effect long after his life ended so the blessings of Jacob exist to this very day because blessings are much more than just good wishes. Rather they are eternal, spiritual bundles of goodness that can change the physical world for the better.

But not everyone can bless; Only someone who really has love and affection for the one being blessed.

More than anything else Yaakov truly desired Moshiach and the future redemption (see Rashi on Gen.33:14) and his blessings were designed to hasten its arrival (see Rashi 47:28). Then he would again be united with his children in the Holy Land.

Just as Menasha, perhaps the worst sinner of all time, found comfort and forgiveness so will all Jewish souls; the blessings of Jacob will take full effect. That is why Yaakov blessed his sons; because in the future when Moshiach will gather all the Jews to the holy land it will be revealed that every Jew is holy, the tribes will again be reinstated and Yaakov’s blessings will really come true.

But now it’s all up to us; we just have to do all we can to make it all real and bring

Moshiach NOW!!

Copyright © 1999-2008 Rabbi Tuvia Bolton of Yeshiva Ohr T’mimim in K’far-Chabad, Israel and their website is: OhrTmimim.Org/torah

All rights reserved. No unauthorized reproduction or copying of this material shall occur without prior permission.

We recommend that you visit them for more info…

*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***

*** We WANT Moshiach, Now!!! ***

By the way, You, too, can help hasten the coming of Moshiach, by doing ONE more Mitzvah. ***

*** We WANT Moshiach, Now!!! ***

*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Rabbi Bolton’s Parsha Story: Parshas Vayigash

Posted on January 1, 2009. Filed under: A Parsha Story, a Rabbi Bolton Story, a Rabbi Tuvia Bolton Story, a Rabbi Tuvia Bolton Story | Torah, Jewish Customs, Jewish traditions, Parshas Hashavua, Parshas Hashavuah, Parshas Vayigash, Parshat Hashavua, Parshat Hashavuah, Parshat Vayigash, Rabbi Bolton Stories, Rabbi Bolton Story, Rabbi Tuvia Bolton Story, Story by Rabbi Bolton, The Parshah Story, The Truth, Torah, Torah is THE Truth, True, Truth, Weekly Parsha, Weekly Parshah, Weekly sedra, Weekly Sedrah | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

BS”D

A Parsha Story by:

Rabbi Tuvia Bolton of OhrTmimim.Org/torah

On this week’s Parsha:

Vayigash 5769

In this week’s Torah portion we read of the re-uniting of Yosef and his brothers in Egypt.

The Torah tells us that when Yosef saw his brother Benjamin they hugged and fell on each other’s shoulders and wept.

Rashi, the foremost commentator on the Bible, explains that Yosef wept on the two Holy Temples that were to be destroyed in the land of Benjamin and Benjamin wept on the destroyed Tabernacle in Shilo in the portion of Yosef.

But at first glance this is not clear. After all, Benjamin and Yosef as the only sons of Rachel were very close. Why not just say that they wept from joy after being united! What have the Temples and Tabernacles got to do with it? And why did each one cry for the Temple of the OTHER? Why not each their own?

To understand this, here is a story (The Storyteller vol. 3 Pg 171)

Some 200 years ago in a small village in Poland lived an old, poor, simple Jew called Getzel HaMafshet (the hide remover) and his wife in a run-down hut.

Getzel had been a strong, robust fellow whose job was to strip the hides from slaughtered cattle in the slaughter house. It was difficult work and paid very little but he had been good at it, it was just about all he knew how to do and he was totally satisfied with the meager life he and his wife led. He was a quiet fellow but always had a smile on his face, a warm handshake, a word of praise for G-d and a good word for and about everyone.

He wasn’t able to really learn Torah, only to read from the Prayer Book and the Book of Psalms but he was healthy and happy.

In fact, only at the age of seventy did he begin to slow down. But gradually, as the years passed, he lessened his hours of work and his wife had to do some sewing and cooking for others to make ends meet.

Finally, when Getzel must have been close to eighty, his wife appeared before the Rabbi of the town saying that her husband felt the time had come for him to return his soul to his Father in Heaven and he wanted to ask the Rabbi something.

The Rabbi closed the book he was studying, and followed the woman to her humble dwelling.

She stepped aside respectfully to let the Rabbi open the door but when he did, and saw Getzel lying in bed a sudden look of astonishment passed over his face and he closed it, stepped back for a few seconds, then opened it again and entered.

Getzel’s pale face lit up a bit when he saw the Rabbi and he even tried to hold out his hand to shake, but he was too weak.

Getzel’s voice was barely audible. He apologized for troubling the Rabbi and explained why he did it.

“Rabbi, listen, I’m about to go and I am very troubled. I never really did much for G-d here. I was too illiterate to teach or even learn Torah. Why, I could barely read the prayers. No good deeds either. I was always working or resting and I was too poor to give charity. Heh! I don’t think I ever helped anyone! That’s why I called you.

“Now I’m going before the heavenly court and, well… I have nothing to show for the time I was here. Don’t even have a son or someone to say Kaddish (mourners prayer) for my soul either; never had children.

“That’s why I’ve troubled you Rabbi … please forgive me a thousand times. Please do me this favor! Even though, I have no money to pay, please find someone to say Kaddish for me and pray for my soul.” And he began to cry silently.

“Of-course, Getzel! I promise” answered the Rabbi. “You don’t have to cry. But listen, Getzel, listen. What you said about good deeds. Well, I don’t think you’re right. That is, I’m sure you must have done something outstandingly good; some big Mitzvah. Maybe you forgot. Think Getzel! Please try to remember. I’m sure you did something.”

Getzel slowly shook his head no and a tear ran down his cheek. “Good deed?” He whispered “No, nothing! No. Nothin’…” Suddenly he closed his eyes and was silent.

His eyes opened, looking at the Rabbi with satisfaction. “You’re right! There is something. It’s not so special… but it was …..Something!

“A long time ago, maybe fifty years, I was walking to work, to the slaughter house, when I hear a noise. I looked up and saw horses galloping full speed, pulling a carriage filled with ladies and children screaming. It was coming toward me fast, racing down the hill. The driver must have been drunk or something but it was barreling down weaving back and forth, filled with women and children all screaming and crying.

I was young and strong back then. I jumped in the middle of the road and began waving my hands to force the horses to the side. Then when the wagon was almost on me I jumped aside, grabbed on, jumped in, sat next to the driver who was completely drunk, and slowed it down. The people were all confused, almost fainting, dressed up like going to a wedding. So I drove it into the town where a wedding was just beginning, tied it to a post and went to work.”

The story took a lot of energy from Getzel, he lay back down but his eyes were bright with hope.

“I guess I saved their lives Rabbi. But, how did you know? I mean, if you hadn’t forced me…. I don’t know how I remembered! How did you know? “

The Rabbi leaned forward and said. “My dear Getzel, did you notice that when I first came in to your room I was so surprised I closed the door again? I was surprised because I saw something. You know what I saw Getzel?

“Well, over your head was a Menorah burning! It was glowing with a brilliant shine! I knew you must have done something special. My dear Getzel, you are a Tzaddik!! I knew it when I saw that light. And now I know what it is.

“Do you hear me Getzel?” The Rabbi continued softly, the Mishnah in Sanhedrin says that anyone who saves even one person has merit as though he saved the entire world and you saved many worlds many times over!! If you ask me Getzel, in heaven you have nothing to worry about!”

Getzel was nodding his head and smiling at the Rabbi in wide-eyed astonishment with tears of joy and gratitude.

“Now I have a favor to ask of you.” The Rabbi continued. “When you get to heaven, if you are able to, I want you to let me know how the heavenly court dealt with you. And regarding the saying of Kaddish, I promise to have it taken care of.”

That evening Getzel passed away and the next day was buried among the righteous of the community. Three days later he appeared to the Rabbi in a dream and said.

“Rabbi, hello! I made a promise to you and now I am permitted to fulfill it. I came to tell you that when I appeared before the Heavenly Court a huge scale was placed before me. In the cup on its right side, to my surprise, were stacked up quite a few good deeds and it made me feel good. But then on the left side they started piling all my wrongdoings and I was really scared. They were so many, a lot more than the good ones, that it got closer and closer to the ground. The Judge raised his gavel and was about to bring it down but then just as sentence was about to be pronounced, a wagon drawn by a pair of horses came dashing out of nowhere and landed on the right side of the scale!

“Not just the wagon! The horses, the mud on the wagon wheels and, of course, all the ladies and children in the wagon including the drunken driver! It reversed the whole thing. Suddenly the scale tilted in my favor and a host of bright angels jumped aboard the wagon to weigh it down totally. Then a voice came from Heaven saying ‘Open the Gates of Righteousness for the Tzaddikim!’ and the gates of heaven opened. But before I entered I was told I had to first fulfill my promise to you.

“Now I must go, but please tell everyone that what seems to be small, even one good deed, in the physical world can tip all the scales here.”

This answers our questions.

There is no reason to cry or get emotional about one’s own problems. These demand immediate action, not crying. Like when Getzel in our story saw the wagon, he knew that he had to act fast and not think or cry.

But if we see problems of others that are out of our control and there is nothing we can DO to solve or correct… then we must at least cry, pray and hope that they will do all they can to fix it.

That is why Yosef and Benjamin wept for the Temples; because Yosef and Benjamin were not just individual people with private problems. Their lives touched at the essence of man and the purpose of all mankind. And there is nothing more essential to mankind than the Holy Temples where the Creator was revealed in His creation.

Therefore each wept for the other’s destruction because each knew that it was the most they could do; in the end each person has to correct his/her own faults and selfish attitudes that cause destruction and exile; others can only cry and feel for them. (Something like the Rabbi did for Getzel in our story).

This is a very important lesson to us. We must fix ourselves up in every way possible; eliminate hatred, worry, jealousy, negativity and selfishness…. the real causes of our problems and of the terrible exile we’re in.
But we must also cry, pray and feel for others when we can’t actively help.

Then, in the merit of brotherly love we can look forward to the building of the Third Temple, the gathering of all the Jews in Jerusalem and true world peace, blessing and joy with…

Moshiach NOW!!



Copyright © 1999-2008 Rabbi Tuvia Bolton of Yeshiva Ohr T’mimim in K’far-Chabad, Israel and their website is: OhrTmimim.Org/torah

All rights reserved. No unauthorized reproduction or copying of this material shall occur without prior permission.



We recommend that you visit them for more info…

*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***

*** We WANT Moshiach, Now!!! ***

By the way, You, too, can help hasten the coming of Moshiach, by doing ONE more Mitzvah. ***

*** We WANT Moshiach, Now!!! ***

Tags:

A Parsha Story, a Rabbi Bolton Story, a Rabbi Tuvia Bolton Story, Jewish Customs, Parshas Vayigash, Rabbi Bolton Story, Rabbi Tuvia Bolton Story, Story by Rabbi Bolton, The Parshah Story, The Truth, Torah, True, Truth, Weekly Parsha, Weekly sedra, Weekly Sedrah, Parshat Vayigash, Parshat Vayeishev, Rabbi Bolton Story, Rabbi Bolton Stories, The Truth, Torah, True, Truth, Weekly Parsha, Weekly sedra, Weekly Sedrah , Weekly Parshah, Weekly Sedra, Weekly Sedrah, Parshat Hashavua, Parshat Hashavuah, Parshas Hashavua, Parshas Hashavuah,

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...