Some Information about Sukkos!

Posted on October 19, 2008. Filed under: Advice, Interesting, Jewish Customs, Jewish New Year, Jewish traditions, New year, New Year 5769, Simchas Torah, Sukkos, True, Truth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

BS”D

The following information was copied form Chabad.org and for more information, we think it would be a good idea to search that site for more information:

Laws and Customs:

Eat in Sukkah (7 days)

The festival of Sukkot, commemorating G-d’s enveloping protection of the Children of Israel during their 40-year journey through the desert (1313-1273 BCE), is celebrated for seven days, beginning from the eve of Tishrei 15. During this time, we are commanded to “dwell” in a sukkah — a hut of temporary construction, with a roof covering of raw, unfinished vegetable matter (branches, reeds, bamboo, etc.) — signifying the temporality and fragily of human habitation and man-made shelter and our utter dependence upon G-d’s protection and providence. “How [does one fulfill] the mitzvah of dwelling in the sukkah? One should eat, drink, and live in the sukkah, both day and night, as one lives in one’s house on the other days of the year: for seven days a person should make his home his temporary dwelling, and his sukkah his permanent dwelling” (Code of Jewish Law, Orach Chaim 639:1).

At least one k’zayit (approx. 1 oz.) of bread should be eaten in the sukkah on the first evening of the festival, between nightfall and midnight. A special blessing, Leishiv BaSukkah, is recited. For the rest of the festival, all meals must be eaten in the sukkah (see the Code of Jewish Law or consult a Halachic authority as to what constitutes a “meal”). Chabad custom is to refrain from eating or drinking anything outside of the sukkah, even a glass of water.

The Ushpizin:

According to Kabbalistic tradition, we are visited in the sukkah by seven supernal ushpizin (“guests”) — Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, Aaron, Joseph and David. On each of the seven days of the festival, another of the seven ushpizin (in the above order) leads the group.

(The sixth Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn (1880-1950) spoke of seven “chassidic ushpizin” as well: the Baal Shem Tov, the Maggid (Rabbi DovBer of Mezeritch), and the first five rebbes of Chabad: Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi, Rabbi DovBer of Lubavitch, Rabbi Menachem Mendel (the “Tzemach Tzeddek”), Rabbi Shmuel, and Rabbi Sholom DovBer. The Lubavitcher Rebbe would speak each night of Sukkot on the special characteristics of both the biblical and the chassidic ushpizin of the day and their connection to each other and their specific day of the festival.)

The “Four Kinds” (for 6 days)

“And you shall take for yourself on the first day,” instructs the Torah in Leviticus “the splendid fruit of a tree, fronds of dates, the branch of the thick-leafed tree and aravot of the river.” Torah SheBaal Peh (the oral tradition given to Moses at Sinai and handed threough the generations, and later documented in the Mishnah and Talmud) identifies the four kinds as the etrog (citron), lulav (unopened palm branch), hadass (myrtle twig, of which three are taken) and aravah (willow, two twigs). The palm branch, three myrtle twigs and two willow twigs are bound together (with rings made from palm leaves).

Each day of Sukkot — except Shabbat — we take the lulav in hand, recite a blessing over it, take hold of the etrog, hold the “Four Kinds” together, and move them back and forth in all directions (right, left, forward, up, down and back). An additional blessing, shehecheyanu, is recited the first time that the Four Kinds are taken during the festival. We also hold the Four Kinds during the Hallel prayer (moving them as above in specified places in the text) and the Hoshaanot prayers (during which we march around the reading table in the synagogue) which are included in the daily service each day of Sukkot.

Chol Hamoed

The seven days of the festival of Sukkot consist of two days of “Yom Tov”, followed by five days of “Chol Hamoed” (“weekdays of the festival”; also called “the intermediate days”). In the Land of Israel, there is only one day of Yom Tov, followed by six days of Chol Hamoed.

On Yom Tov all creative work is forbidden as on Shabbat, except for the tasks involved in food preparation (e.g., lighting a fire from a pre-existing flame, cooking, carrying “from domain to domain”); on Chol Hamoed, work whose avoidance would result in “significant loss” is permitted. Otherwise, all the mitzvot and customs of Sukkot apply: eating in the sukkah, taking the “four kinds”, etc. The “Yaale V’yavo” prayer is included in all prayers and Grace After Meals. Hallel, Hoshaanot and Musaf are recited following the Shacharit (morning) prayers.

It is the Chabad custom not to put on tefillin during Chol Hamoed, as on Shabbat and the festivals.

Hoshana-Rabba:

Today (this year, falling on October 21, 2008) is the last day when we eat in the sukkah (although the blessing on the sukkah, recited before eating a meal, is not recited today). Shortly before sunset, many have the custom to enjoy a last snack in the sukkah, thus “bidding the sukkah farewell” until the following year.

Note: In certain communities it is customary to eat some or all of this day’s meals out of the sukkah.

Shmini-Atzeres / Simchat Torah (This year falling on October 22nd & 23rd, 2008)

Simchat Torah (“Rejoicing of the Torah”), on which we conclude, and begin anew, the annual Torah reading cycle. The event is marked with great rejoicing, and the “hakafot” procession, held both on the eve and morning of Simchat Torah, in which we march and dance with Torah scrolls around the reading table in the synagogue. In the words of the Chassidic saying, “On Simchat Torah, we rejoice in the Torah, and the Torah rejoices in us; the Torah, too, wants to dance, so we become the Torah’s dancing feet.”

During today’s Torah reading, everyone, including children under the age of Bar Mitzvah, is called up to the Torah; thus the reading is read numerous times, and each aliyah is given collectively to many individuals, so that everyone should recite the blessing over the Torah on this day.

*** To find a Sukkos /Shmini-Atzeres / Simchas-Torah event near you, please go to to the site below:

http://www.chabad.org/holidays/jewishnewyear/calendar_events_cdo/search/sukkot


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*** We WANT Moshiach, Now!!! ***

By the way, You, too, can help hasten the coming of Moshiach by doing ONE more Mitzvah.

*** We WANT Moshiach, Now!!! ***


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One Response to “Some Information about Sukkos!”

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Great INFO. Have a great holiday.


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